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Sunday, January 4, 2015

Guest Post & eARC Review: Misplaced Affection by Bloggermomma ~ Wade Kelly

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Wade Kelly lives and writes in conservative, small-town America on the east coast where it is not easy to live free and open in one's beliefs. She writes passionately about the controversial issues witnessed in real life and strives to make a difference by making people think. Wade does not have a background in writing or philosophy, but still draws from personal experience to ponder contentious subjects on paper. When not writing, she is thinking about writing, and more than likely scribbling ideas on sticky notes in the car while playing "taxi driver" for her three children. She likes snakes, and has a tegu (lizard) living in her bathroom.

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Date Published: Jan 1 2015
Misplaced Affection
by Wade Kelly 

Clichés are overrated and loving the boy next door may not be as genuine as the love Flynn sacrifices along the way.
Knowing he’s gay and acting on it were two separate notions to Flynn Brewer until he’d met Keith, his first boyfriend, in high school. Before then, being gay wasn’t as real as the pain of living day-to-day. Flynn’s fear of coming out to his religious best friend Zach in their conservative community destroyed his relationship with Keith, but Flynn rationalized his avoidance and bottled up the truth until it was regrettably too late.
Zachary Mitchell was the perfect son and role model as far as the outside world could tell. Active in his church while attending college, Zach had a personality that could sell anything, do anything, or be anything. Except, he couldn’t sell the truth to himself. Just when he was ready to reveal his internal conflict to Flynn and expose the darkness lurking in his heart, and in his “perfect” family, Zach met a girl and got sucked deeper into his chasm of deception.
Caught in a living Newton’s Cradle of his own design, Flynn must choose between idealistic childhood fantasy, or a tempestuous passion that could ignite the very air he breathes. 

Review by multitaskingmomma
My Rating: 5 of 5 Stars


Misplaced Affection is a story full of life's clichés. In three parts. One part for each boy concerned. Each story told from their personal points of views. This is an especially great story to read for the one story is seen from three sides, much like a He Said, He Said thing only more. The best thing about this particular read is that even if the drama could twist and turn the reader's emotions up as could be expected from Ms Wade herself, it also can be quite amusing and frustrating and hilarious, just like Jock was. So yes, this is a definitive Wade Kelly Special but surprisingly, no matter how I was warned of it, I did not shed a tear. Why? Read on and find out the why of it, or make it simpler: get the book and read for yourself, then read this review. Deal?

So let's move on...

Part One: Flynn's Story.

So here we have young Flynn whose best friend was his next door neighbor who just happened to have been his deceased older brother's best friend growing up. When his mother and brother died, the two gravitated to each other. But Flynn had a problem with Zach as he is gay and Zach comes from a family background simply explained as backwoods, forest trail, cult-ish and overall bigoted conservative. So being all out and honest about his sexuality was thrown out the window. When he meets out and proud Keith, he finally knows the meaning of honesty and love, but secretly. There the problem begins.

Part Two: Zach's Story. As mentioned, yeah, he comes from that sort of family background and more secrets than expected. Although, it is expected, sort of. You'll know what I mean once you read the book. (Trying so hard not to reveal anything here or the story gets spoiled.) He relies on the younger Flynn for all his troubles but is also the rock that Flynn relies on. He has his own secrets and could not speak of them should he get bolt and lightninged dead or cursed. He goes through life like a drunk but as he does not drink, its an emotional high kind of drunk. But not the good high, I call it the Bad Trip. 

Part Three: Keith's Point of View. He is Flynn's boyfriend and has been for years. He is older and a bit more controlling and his ego is a good match. He breaks up with Flynn at the drop of the hat a few times but goes crawling back after realizing he cannot let Flynn go as he is so in love with the young man. When tragedy strikes, he looks up and sees that maybe his pride should be thrown onto the side and maybe he should man up a bit. However, his decisions can make or break him and everyone around him and maybe he should not make decisions right now. 

The whole story unfolds through several years and develops quite brutally in some areas but slowly in others. The three young men's characters also develop spectacularly so there are confusing and frustrating times for me. Despite all that, this is difficult not to read for the lives of these three unfold at a rapid pace. Bear in mind we have three young men in this story, even if there is no menage involved, but these three young men grow through the pages of this book and just like in real life, it can be frustrating. The best part is that they are so honestly real that I call them: familiar. Each of them I can remember as myself or others I grew up with or went to class with. They are the embodiment of the people around me while I grew up and that was fascinating. It is also the reason why nary a tear fell for I expected the unexpected and shrugged it off. I can say, however, many will hate this story for its realness but they will not be able to put this down either.

Overall, and I mean ignoring the usual ARC typos and such, this was just not what I expected and must highly recommend to all. It's a Kelly Book folks! It's a Kelly Book!


(Note from multitaskingmomma: I learned to read and love M/M books as written by the creative mind of W.K. and soon became a huge fan of both author and woman. What I love about her works is her ability to dig deep into the psyche of young men and women and through that, create characters who are very real and so can be terrifying to accept because of that 'realness'. Misplaced Affection is a surprise read for although it does come from the same writer, it is different from the rest of her works. Yes the writer is the same, but the style is different and so the impact is different as well.)


 Variations of Style: 
by Guest Bloggermomma ~ Wade Kelly

Learning to write with different literary techniques was part of my grammar class in the fall of 2013 when I started writing Misplaced Affection. I wrote two scenes in that class and kept on going once the semester ended. I’d like to think I learned something in that class about varying how I write. I think authors should always strive to improve and learn different techniques because it can keep their writing fresh and new. Although, that said, there are plenty of authors who stick with one style and they do very well!

Perhaps my feeling stem from impatience or boredom? I don’t know. I like to try different things so I guess that’s why I often write with different POVs and flashbacks and stuff. One linear story from one POV seems too normal. HAHA. I am not that normal. I tend to push boundaries especially as I get older. Maybe it is because I am more confident in myself that I can step out and take more chances? Again, I don’t know. 

What I want to do is write what is in my heart and on my mind no matter how the story finally comes together. I want to create passion on a page and convey emotion to my readers. I want to make readers weep and laugh and sigh. So I mix things up and I am trying different styles. 

Names Can Never Hurt Me was the only book I have done so far with one POV in a linear timeline. It is the easiest to read. When Love Is Not Enough is the most difficult because of the time jumps and POV shifts etc. With Misplaced Affection I tried to keep the POVs in different sections (Part 1, 2, & 3) so readers could follow easily. I also only have two flashbacks that I can think of and I believe they are marked accordingly. I am learning how to incorporate my strange flare as well as make it easier for readers. I don’t want to confuse people. I desire a read that sucks you in and doesn’t let you go until the last word. Can I do that as I vary my style and use different literary techniques without pulling the reader out of the story? I hope so!

What I hope you find is that every Wade Kelly story is different, but worth taking the chance to read.

In this excerpt, I was “exploring chunks” as the teacher called it. By writing in short bursts of nouns called a “noun collage,” as well as using objects that are invisible, it is a way of painting a concise picture. (Supposedly.) You’ll have to let me know how I did. ☺




Excerpt

Strangers yelling. Long halls. Flickering lights. Beeps. Bleach. Bandages. Crying children. Nurses rushing in different directions. Lost. Alone. Wondering. Waiting. A flash of someone familiar and I’m pulled down a hallway by my flaccid fingers.
No words spoken. No tears in my eyes. No explanation. No warning. No preparation. Suddenly I’m there in the room and my best friend is hooked up to monitors and wires and bags of goop hanging on metal poles. He’s lying still, and all the oxygen in the room gets sucked through air-ducts by a gigantic vacuum cleaner, and I’m left gasping for breath. An invisible hand seizes my chest and closes around my ribs until I’m crushed by its force. My heart can’t beat because I have no breath, no air.
The woman, my mother, face ashen and eyes gaunt, leads me closer to the place I don’t want to be. It’s that twelve-by-twelve tile next to his bed that rattles my knees and tests my bladder. Quaking like an aspen leaf, shivering like my old dog in the snow, I drag my feet, rubbery and resistant, in the direction my mother pulls my hand.
I can’t see his eyes. I want to see his eyes.
The bandages and bruises cover half his face, and white medical tape obscures the rest as it holds what looks like a plastic tube in his mouth.
“Nathan,” my mother says as though he can hear her. “Zach is here.” She looks at me and squeezes my shoulders as if transferring all her strength to me, only it drains down my arms and through a colander, pooling at my feet. I have no strength without Nathan. He has been my best friend my entire life. Twelve years isn’t enough, I scream, but the yelling that echoes is contained in the spaces of my mind. My mother doesn’t hear it. My mother urges me forward.
“Talk to him, Zach.”
I muster up the jellyfish in my gut and whisper, “Nate.” When he doesn’t move, I try again. “Nate. Wake up, Nate. You can’t leave me. We were going to build a fort, remember? Your dad bought that nail gun and showed you how to use it. Flynn is too young to hold the nail gun. Nate. Wake up.”
My face is wet and my vision blurs. Then those sadistic monitors start beeping really loud and really long. One piercing, monotonous beep to wipe out every other sound in the room.
Doctors rush in. People shoving. Nurses ordering. I can’t hear the words because the loud, constant beep punctures my eardrums. No words. No tears. No heartbeat. No me. I died in that room with my best friend.
Blurb:
Clichés are overrated and loving the boy next door may not be as genuine as the love Flynn sacrifices along the way.

Knowing he’s gay and acting on it were two separate notions to Flynn Brewer until he’d met Keith, his first boyfriend, in high school. Before then, being gay wasn’t as real as the pain of living day-to-day. Flynn’s fear of coming out to his religious best friend Zach in their conservative community destroyed his relationship with Keith, but Flynn rationalized his avoidance and bottled up the truth until it was regrettably too late.

Zachary Mitchell was the perfect son and role model as far as the outside world could tell. Active in his church while attending college, Zach had a personality that could sell anything, do anything, or be anything. Except, he couldn’t sell the truth to himself. Just when he was ready to reveal his internal conflict to Flynn and expose the darkness lurking in his heart, and in his “perfect” family, Zach met a girl and got sucked deeper into his chasm of deception.


Caught in a living Newton’s Cradle of his own design, Flynn must choose between idealistic childhood fantasy, or a tempestuous passion that could ignite the very air he breathes.   



Related link:
Review: My Roommate's a Jock? Well, Crap! by Wade Kelly


1 comment:

  1. I agree, an excellent book with realistic characters.

    ReplyDelete