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Friday, July 10, 2015

Release Blitz: Take A Tour of the Work Behind The Klockwerk Kraken by Aidee Ladnier

Klockwerk Kraken


The KlockWerk Kraken cover (1)




When the right space pilot walks into his bar, a desperate bartender uses all his wiles (and tentacles) to talk the man into business and his bed--but the spacer is still enslaved by his past and isn't sure he can deal with a two-handed lover, much less one with six.
As the supply shipments stop coming, Teo Houdin needs all his tentacles to keep his waystation bar open. Facing a riot by thirsty miners stranded in the backwater of the galaxy, Teo helps a greenie space pilot buy a ship in return for a regular haul of liquor. But he longs for the courage to invite the enigmatic spacer to fill his lonely bed as well.
Still smarting from his newly implanted navigational ports, Jimenez knows owning his own ship will prevent him from ever being bought and sold again. For a former slave, transporting cargo through the emptiness of space sounds like paradise, but after meeting the compassionate and sexy Teo, his heart feels empty, too.
At the edge of the galaxy's spiral arm, can Teo convince Jimenez that the heart has its own tentacles and theirs should be entwined forever?


The Mythology of the Kraken

By Aidee Ladnier


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9d/Colossal_octopus_by_Pierre_Denys_de_Montfort.jpgIn my new novel, The Klockwerk Kraken, I have a tentacled bartender—don’t laugh, a few extra arms come in handy on a busy Friday night. But the novel is actually named after the bar—The Klockwerk Kraken. It’s a place that Teo (the bartender with tentacles) has built as an homage to the mythological idea of the kraken.
And what is a kraken?
Well, in Norse mythology krakens were sea monsters that lived off the coast of Norway, Greenland, and Iceland. In fact, the word kraken is Germanic in origin and refers specifically to octopuses. The kraken of mythology was so enormous it could wrap its arms around a ship and then physically drag it under water.
The first written account of the kraken was in the 13th century, in the Icelandic saga Örvar-Oddr. It referred to the monster as Hafgufa (or sea mist). I can only imagine the terror of seeing a gigantic tentacle rising out of the mist late at night on the sea.
Of course, today we believe the kraken myth refers to the Colossal Squid which can grow to a size of 60 feet and has been known to wrestle with sperm whales. There are even accounts of colossal squid attacking ships in the modern era, however most end up badly injured by the boats’ propellers.
And recently there’s been speculation about a really large octopus that might have roamed the prehistoric seas. The bones from aquatic dinosaurs have been found in strange patterns accompanied by fossilized beaks of enormous cephalopods.
Maybe the kraken isn’t so mythological at all…


Famous Tentacles in Literature

By Aidee Ladnier



So my new novel, The Klockwerk Kraken, has a tentacled bartender. There, I’ve said it. I wrote a romance novel with a character who has tentacles.


But tentacles have actually been present in literature for a long time. Besides appearing in Norse sagas, creatures with tentacles have had poems, books, even screenplays written about them.


Most lovers of tentacles cite the poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Kraken:
Below the thunders of the upper deep;
Far, far beneath in the abysmal sea,
His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep
The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee
About his shadowy sides: above him swell
Huge sponges of millennial growth and height;
And far away into the sickly light,
From many a wondrous grot and secret cell
Unnumber'd and enormous polypi
Winnow with giant arms the slumbering green.
There hath he lain for ages and will lie
Battening upon huge seaworms in his sleep,
Until the latter fire shall heat the deep;
Then once by man and angels to be seen,
In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die.


Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea has a famous scene where Captain Nemo’s submarine is attacked by giant squids. And lovers of horror are well versed in H.P. Lovecraft’s slumbering, tentacled god, Cthulu. Even Herman Melville speaks in Moby Dick about “the great live squid”. Most of the depictions of tentacled beasts are those of slumbering giants on the bottom of the ocean, quiet, until man awakens them.


But my hero, Teo is anything but hiding. He’s one of the few people on his planet that have traveled extensively in the galaxy before settling down at the Switchpoint Waystation, far from home and family. He’s a little lonely, but that quickly changes at the start of my book. I hope you’ll check out The Klockwerk Kraken and meet Teo, my tentacled hero.
So my new novel, The Klockwerk Kraken, has a tentacled bartender. There, I’ve said it. I wrote a romance novel with a character who has tentacles.

But tentacles have actually been present in literature for a long time. Besides appearing in Norse sagas, creatures with tentacles have had poems, books, even screenplays written about them.

Most lovers of tentacles cite the poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Kraken:

Below the thunders of the upper deep;
Far, far beneath in the abysmal sea,
His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep
The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee
About his shadowy sides: above him swell
Huge sponges of millennial growth and height;
And far away into the sickly light,
From many a wondrous grot and secret cell
Unnumber'd and enormous polypi
Winnow with giant arms the slumbering green.
There hath he lain for ages and will lie
Battening upon huge seaworms in his sleep,
Until the latter fire shall heat the deep;
Then once by man and angels to be seen,
In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die.


Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea has a famous scene where Captain Nemo’s submarine is attacked by giant squids. And lovers of horror are well versed in H.P. Lovecraft’s slumbering, tentacled god, Cthulu. Even Herman Melville speaks in Moby Dick about “the great live squid”. Most of the depictions of tentacled beasts are those of slumbering giants on the bottom of the ocean, quiet, until man awakens them.


But my hero, Teo is anything but hiding. He’s one of the few people on his planet that have traveled extensively in the galaxy before settling down at the Switchpoint Waystation, far from home and family. He’s a little lonely, but that quickly changes at the start of my book. I hope you’ll check out The Klockwerk Kraken and meet Teo, my tentacled hero.


A Tour of the Freedom’s Wing with Captain Jimenez

By Aidee Ladnier


Aidee: *bright smile* Today I’m very pleased to bring you Captain Jimenez, the owner of the Freedom’s Wing. Captain Jimenez, do you mind if I show everyone the schematic of your skimmer?
Jimenez: It’s a little rudimentary.
Aidee: That doesn’t matter. You said you had a friend draw it up for you?
Jimenez: Yes. The rough was made by Clay Cardwell. I didn’t know what you’d want for this interview so I thought this might be the easiest thing to bring.
Aidee: *squints at the image* You said you’re outfitted for courier and light cargo but are those unlabeled gun turrets?
Jimenez: Pirates roam the uncolonized systems. The guns protect my skimmer.
Aidee: Understood. Ummm, so have you always wanted to captain your own ship?
Jimenez: No.
Aidee: Can you elaborate? *shuffles notes nervously*
Jimenez: Owning The Freedom’s Wing was something I couldn’t have done a dozen revs ago. I didn’t dream of it because it wasn’t possible.
Aidee: I heard you had an interesting upbringing—you grew up in a crèche, as I understand?
Jimenez: I’d rather not speak about my early life.
Aidee: Oh. Okay. Well, you make regular runs through the Nothing. What’s that like being in space surrounded by Nothing? I mean, I’ve never traveled off-planet. I can’t imagine the tedium of space travel.
Jimenez: When you have nav and captain’s ports, travel is a little different.
Aidee: I saw those. You have the implants connected to your brain?
Jimenez: Yes. Here. *turns and points to three round ports in his neck* The bottom ones are for navigation and the top one for higher ship functions. *turns back around and settles in his seat* This allows the ship to use my brain for processing with the main computers. Despite the advances in biocomputing, the human brain is still faster at assessing the needs and threats to human life.
Aidee: That would make sense. We’ve literally evolved to protect ourselves. So when you plug in, you extend your sense of self to the entire ship?
Jimenez: Yeah. It feels like that. I can feel her humming along my bones. Her drive system pumps through me like a heart. Her hull, my skin.
Aidee: *winces* Ouch. You must pray you don’t get caught in a random debris field. That must hurt when she suffers an impact.
Jimenez: *chuckles softly* It’s not quite that literal. I register the sensation, but it’s more like a ripple than pain.
Aidee: And my last question, what’s your favorite drink?
Jimenez: Whiskey.
Aidee: *leans forward* But what type of whiskey?
Jimenez: No favorite. I like to try a different one at each place I visit. That way I associate the place with the taste.

Aidee: I love that idea. Well, thank you very much for stopping by. I hope my readers are looking forward to finding out more about you and your adventures in The Klockwerk Kraken.


Pedigree of a Fictional Hero – Teo Houdin

By Aidee Ladnier


In my book, The Klockwerk Kraken, I have a hero named Teo Houdin and he is a far distant descendant of the Houdin family of France.

https://images-blogger-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2Fupload.wikimedia.org%2Fwikipedia%2Fcommons%2Fe%2Fe7%2FRoberthoudin.jpg&container=blogger&gadget=a&rewriteMime=image%2F*
Most people are aware of the magician that actually married into the Houdin family--Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin, the French illusionist that Houdini took his name after.


But Robert-Houdin began life with the last name Robert, the son of a watchmaker in Blois, France. Jean Eugène Robert wed the daughter of a well-known Parisian horologist, Josèphe Cecile Houdin. And for business reasons, he petitioned the government to hyphenate his last name with that of his bride, becoming Robert-Houdin.

The Houdin family were known for handcrafting each piece of clockwork that went into their creations. And while working in their shop, Robert-Houdin began to tinker with mechanisms and automatons. He built marvelous inventions that grew oranges on stage, performed cup and ball magic tricks, sang like birds, and danced across tightropes.

In my story, The Klockwerk Kraken, it is his nephew, the child of the younger brother of Robert-Houdin's wife, that joins the illusionist in his mechanical mania. And from that fictional nephew descends more clockmakers, more magicians, and more makers of automata.

Until one particular descendant is born, an early settler on the planet of Celos, someone whose family left Earth and whose many times great great grandparents submitted to genetic manipulation to allow their children to better survive in a strange little corner of the galaxy. This early Celosian had a few extra limbs to make his day job easier as one of the hundreds of mechanics that keep the inner workings of the artificial satellite ring around the planet functioning. And who at night goes home to make strange little clockwork animals that blink and stretch and awaken to life.

That early Houdin settler on Celos gave the little clockwork octopus in the story his spark and movement. And it's that tiny piece of mechanical life that will remind my hero, Teo Houdin, that home is still waiting for him, no matter how far away he roams.



About the Author

AideeNOH8Aidee Ladnier began writing fiction at twelve years old but took a hiatus to be a magician’s assistant, ride in hot air balloons, produce independent movies, collect interesting shoes, and amass a secret file with the CIA. A lover of genre fiction, it has been a lifelong dream of Aidee's to write both romance and erotica with a little science-fiction, fantasy, mystery, or the paranormal thrown in to add a zing.

You can find her on her blog at http://www.aideeladnier.com or on her favorite social media sites:
   

   



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